SUSTAINABILITY PERFORMANCE REPORTING SYSTEM: Methodology

Methodology

Integrated Impact Assessment (IIA) is define as an activity design to generate or produce interdisciplinary numeric or qualitative indicators to interpret, predict and communicate information about the immediate or delayed, foreseeable or remote effects of a given or series of actions, proffering what mitigation and compensation measures to be put in place against consequences of project, programme and policy actions on the well-being of an ecosystem. Further, in IIA there are many different ways in which different methods can be combined in an investigation. The most cost-effective combinations must be assessed in relation to each assessment, the purpose of the assessment, the particular issues to be addressed, the stakeholders involved, and ways in which findings are to be used (Egbeleke, 2004).. Although, techniques vary according to the nature of the intervention and the purpose of the assessment, the basic methodology is similar (Kirkpatrick and Hulme, 2001; Egbeleke, 2004).

Continue reading

SUSTAINABILITY PERFORMANCE REPORTING SYSTEM: Review of Corporate Compliance

Noted from Jacson, et al., (2011) survey report United Kingdom been one of the countries promoting TBL reporting among businesses guided by Companies Act (2006) that oblige companies to provide a Business Review on non -financial reporting. Thus majority of FTSE100 companies (all of which have significant stakeholder impacts) are required to publish CRS reports (Henriques, 2010). Furthermore, Henrique’s analysis of FTSE100 compliance with non-financial reporting of Companies Act (2006) found out that 31% do not produced CRS report and there are widespread of variability in the nature and quality of reporting with a low overall level of reporting of non-financial data that might be relevant to stakeholders, other than on economic matters.

Continue reading

SUSTAINABILITY PERFORMANCE REPORTING SYSTEM: Early academic contributions

Early academic contributions

Early academic contributions on CRS theoretical frameworks focused on ensuring that boundaries are assigned to prevent social and financial components of business entity from overpowering or overshadowing each other’s. This was the major problems of modern era business (Crowther and Rayman-Bacchus, 2004). Key among corporate responsibility frameworks that brought to the limelight the need for the demarcation of non-financial from financial performance was the Carroll’s Pyramid and Elkington triple bottom line (TBL) reporting. A review was carried out to determine how their deficiencies have affected CRS performance reporting.

Continue reading

SUSTAINABILITY PERFORMANCE REPORTING SYSTEM: RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

Analytical review of literatures at forefront CRS oriented frameworks was carried out to identify deficiencies. The deficiencies were found to have contributed to CRS reporting inadequacies such as failings to meet stakeholder requirements. From the literature we found that integrated impact assessment (IIA), a methodology used in development projects and policy interventions evaluations possess capability to resolve issues relating to CRS reporting. Also, review of reports on non -financial information reporting was carried out and it was found out that key performance indicators (KPI’s) specification and definition are important for the operations of IIA methodology driven CRS reporting system. Yet corporate responsibility and sustainability key performance indicators (CRS KPI’s) were omitted from Companies Act (2006) review as recommend in reports.

Continue reading

SUSTAINABILITY PERFORMANCE REPORTING SYSTEM: INTRODUCTION

INTRODUCTION

Beyond Carroll’s Pyramid and Elkington Triple Bottom Line (TBL) – integrated impact assessment driven corporate responsibility and sustainability performance reporting system is put forward to improve the quality and reduce variability of corporate responsibility and sustainability reports published by companies. However, key performance indicators specification and definition was found to be crucial for it to be operational. Analysis of reports by FTSE 100 companies revealed that key performance indicators used for reporting are in a state of chaos within industry and across industries. Thus point out the possibility of corporate reputational damage in futuristic terms as well as setting up uncertainties around delivery of world sustainable development performances.

Continue reading

THE BASIC NOTIONS OF INNOVATION: CONCLUSIONS

CONCLUSIONS

This paper sought to give an update on the basic notions of the concept of innovation with reference to how the meaning and types of the concept are documented in literature. The paper drew attention to the increased importance of innovation and examined how its meaning has been constructed from multiples perspectives in academic literature. Importantly, it underscored the ongoing conception of innovation, in literature, as a phenomenon reflective of the process of developing something radically different and the extent to which such new products or services are radically different (Bekkers et al, 2011).

Continue reading

THE BASIC NOTIONS OF INNOVATION: TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATION

In a nutshell, technological innovation through computerization and information technology allowed banks to centralize accounting systems and develop comprehensive database of customers, providing services online or over the telephone. The adoption of information technology through the internet and telephone brought fast and speedy and more efficient customer services. Customers no longer have to wait for hours on end to get their money. The adoption these new technologies sent signals of better and more efficient customer service identities and resulted in favourable corporate image for banks among stakeholders. Financial services

Continue reading

THE BASIC NOTIONS OF INNOVATION: ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY

ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY

The role of technology in the marketplace has been profound, so much so that business organizations that fail to maintain technological innovative momentum will be overtaken by more youthful and vigorous ones. As Twiss (1993) argued, a comparison of today’s market leaders with those operating over two decades ago reveals how many of the once great names have declined in importance or made extinct from the business environment due to their inability to anticipate the effects of new technology.

Continue reading

THE BASIC NOTIONS OF INNOVATION: THREE DOMINANT TYPES OF INNOVATION

Product Innovation: the concept of product innovation has been of paramount interest to firms (Kotabe and Swan, 1995; Schmidt and Calantone, 1998) and is generating more interest among business organizations than ever before. Several important factors are responsible for the recent drive towards product innovation. First is the deregulation of various productive industries coupled with the relaxation of various market control instruments. Second is increased competition arising from the deregulation of markets and third is the desire to satisfy the ever changing needs of customers (Slattery and Nellis, 2005). Fourth, many business organizations in the late 1980’s and the 1990s faced an untold amount of pressure, which had a profound effect on organizational performance and market share. Put another way, marketplace dynamics moved at top speed making it difficult if not impossible for business organizations to identify and track changing customer needs (Shepperd and Pervaiz, 2000). In addition, as market competition on the international scale became fierce; many business organizations resorted to the use of product innovation (Zhang and Doll, 2001; Kessler and Chakranarti, 1996; Cooper and Kleinschmidt, 1994). Bank-customer

Continue reading

THE BASIC NOTIONS OF INNOVATION: INTRODUCTION

INTRODUCTION

Academic work contributing to the concept of innovation is increasing by the day. A number of recent studies (Clausen, 2012; Parida et al, 2012; Piva et al, 2012; Orr and Roth, 2012; Nagji and Tuff, 2012; Govindarajan, 2012; Esty and Charnovitz, 2012) which appear in some decent journals support this view. However, in recent times, only a few of these have given an update of what is known so far with reference to the meaning (see Battistella et al, 2012; Robert and Eric, 2012; Stephenson, 2010; Harmancioglu, 2009) and types of innovation (see Carlo, 2012; Baba, 2012; Friedrich, 2010; Wilson and Doz, 2011; Damanpour, 2009). As such there is an urgent need to raise the volume of academic literature on this subject to create a deeper understanding of the concept. Against this backdrop, this paper aims to strengthen existing literature by providing an update of what is known about the meaning of innovation and the types of innovation that predominate academic literature. The paper opens with a review of works on the meaning of innovation, followed by an analysis of the dominant types of innovation. The paper ends with an analysis of the issues discussed. Direct marketing

Continue reading

Pages: 1 2 Next